Don't forget traditional forms of marketing

Don't forget traditional forms of marketing

While social media take-up is strong, there are signs that more traditional forms of marketing are still crucially important.

In recent years, social media has been one of the most talked about growth areas in marketing. Businesses are increasingly taking to Twitter and Facebook to build their brand and show off their products.

But, recent events suggest that “less fashionable” forms of promotion are still standing strong, with firms offering more traditional techniques continuing to attract significant funding.

The Business Growth Fund (BGF) today announced a £10m investment in The York Mailing Group, the UK's market leader in producing flyers, media inserts and retail brochures.

The firm, founded in 1999, has a client list including Tesco, Marks and Spencer, Lidl and Iceland.

Richard Taylor, senior investment manager at BGF, comments: “I think that many people would look at the physical printing business with some trepidation given how much of the market is moving online.

“What impressed us with Chris, Mike and the wider team at York Mailing was their ability to build a profitable and growing company by targeting a niche area within the sector that is in demand and expanding rapidly.”

York Mailing turned over £75m in 2012, with a profit of £7.6m. They intend to expand their printing capacity by investing in state-of-the-art digital printing machines.

Meanwhile, email marketing continues to be useful because it allows you to target specific customers and grab their attention directly.

A survey by the Direct Marketing Association found that almost 90 per cent of the 250 marketers they surveyed considered email to be "important" or "very important" to their business. 

Email marketing firm Pure360 has attracted £10.5m in investment from Investec and Scottish Equity Partners.

The firm provides a platform and advice to help businesses target their customers with emails and text messages.

Email marketing can often bring to mind thoughts of spam-clogged inboxes, but the firm's CEO Stuart Dawson insists that effective email marketing needn't be a nuisance to customers.

“Our platform helps clients deliver the right message, to the right person, at the right time,” he adds.

Dawson says that, in contrast with email, many people want social media to remain a social, rather than commercial, space. “Email marketing offers a particularly demonstrable return on investment,” he comments.